Camera Obscura (2017)

According to the official synopsis, the film is about a veteran war photographer with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder who sees imminent deaths in his developed photos, questioning his already fragile sanity and putting the lives of those he loves in danger. Jack is a war photographer with his own dark burden and which he is also trying to deal with his Psychiatrist. His fiancee Claire buys an antique camera in an auction and gifts him as an anniversary gift. 

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Delusion (2016)

The official synopsis of Delusion is what something can be easily related to David Fincher's Gone Girl. Frank Parrillo received a letter from his wife who died three years ago. With help from his nephew, Frank decides he’s ready to start over.

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Besetment (2017)

Here arrives another movie from distributors Uncork'd Entertainment who just gave us American Exorcism a couple of weeks back. Besetment is a horror/thriller written and directed by Brad Douglas as his debut feature. The film's official synopsis speaks of a story about Amanda Millard, desperate for a job, takes a maid position at the Oregon Hotel in the creepy, backcountry town of Mitchell, Oregon.

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Demon (2015)

Peter receives a piece of land as a gift for his upcoming wedding. While preparing the property to build a home for his new family, he finds human remains on the ground. He decides to keep the discovery to himself so that all of the wedding arrangements can go on as planned.

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The Narrow Caves (2017)

All that was old is new again. That’s perhaps the greatest innocuous lesson that the modern age has taught us. For all the advancements we’ve made in iPads, iPhones, u-verses and whatever other piece of technology you can stick a vowel in front of, pop culture is currently in the throes of a retro-binge that has more people scrambling for a piece of 8-bit technology than the latest whatever-terabyte console Sony and Microsoft are churning out this week.

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Serial Mom (1994)

In a way, the career of John Waters reflects the evolution of exploitation cinema itself. Starting out in the 1960s with black-and-white microbudget shorts that didn’t so much have narratives as they were a series of shocking, hallucinogenic set pieces, he moved on in the early 1970s to more coherent feature films that were still more shock than substance. In the latter part of the decade and early 80s, he reached a comfortable midpoint, releasing pictures that still retained a certain grindhouse quality while focusing more on conventional storytelling.

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