King Cohen: The Wild World of Filmmaker Larry Cohen (2017)

Often referred to as “the Cassavetes of exploitation,” filmmaker Larry Cohen was responsible for some of the most engaging and transgressive films of the 70's and 80's. Though arguably more famous as the creative force behind the It’s Alive franchise and the quirky cult film Q, his career began as a prolific television writer for dozens of 60's television productions. His work spans six decades of creative and often challenging material, which would make any attempt at a documentary on his legacy a daunting task.

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Animalistic (2015)

When you sit back and think about it, what are human beings but a bunch of sophisticated animals? Yeah sure, we give ourselves laws, create beautiful art, develop science that does important things like provide ugly face Snapchat filters or allow access to videos of cats jumping into boxes. But take out all the “higher thinking” and pretend morals, and we’re just a bunch of animals working off of primal instincts, the two most basic being sex and survival.

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Our House (2018)

Upon finishing Our House, my very first review for CineDump, I thought to myself, “they’re going to think I’m an asshole”. I was really hoping to express the love and passion I have for a genre that I’ve been enamored with since I was, believe it or not, three years old, ever since I first laid my eyes upon John Carpenter’s roaring horror film, Christine, another film that combines ghosts and machine, albeit in a much different sense. But then I realized, if I’m going to be writing here, you’ll all have to get used to my sarcasm eventually, and I can’t imagine a better opportunity to express that than by discussing Our House, a film that I truly believe is trying to bore its audience to death for some unfathomable, sinister purpose.

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Hereditary (2018)

I first began my ignominious career at CineDump by bemoaning the fact that I would never experience something as powerful, soul-shattering, or upsetting as the first run of Friedkin’s The Exorcist. I’ve never been one to be seduced by too-easy tales of the good ol’ days long gone, but sitting pinned into some tacky orange 1970’s seating while the people around me screamed, vomited, and ran for cover---oh, my dear, this is why sick people get into horror movies in the first place: the experience. We could watch cartel videos if we wanted gore or tune in to the news if we wanted tragedy, but that’s not what we want.

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